Home Learning for December 9-13 (Week 16)

  1. Read for at least 30 minutes each night. Complete the online reading log OR one on paper. (Copies are available in class).
    • Alert: Something NEW coming in January. Check back for the big reading reveal.
  2. Reflect back on Week 15, and complete the “Reflection: Learner Profile & Approaches to Learning” form.
  3. Explore the recommendations on IXL.com. These connect directly to what we have been learning in class.
  • **A Scholar has a goal: This week, we answered over 390 questions and almost 3  hours = 3.0 hours = 180 minutes  on IXL. 

Announcements

  1. Library is scheduled weekly on Thursdays.
  2. P.E. is scheduled weekly on Wednesdays and Fridays.
    1. Come dressed to exercise – sneakers, hat, sunscreen.
    2. Bring a water bottle
  3. Check your lunch card balance weekly.

Coming Soon

Below is a list of upcoming events of which to be aware.

  • December 9
    • SS Design Class: Scratch Games – 8:50 a.m.
    • SS Design Class: Pinewood Derby – 2:45 p.m.
  • December 13
    • Assembly
    • Early Dismissal – 11:30 a.m.
      • Notes:
        • Lunch will NOT be served on Friday
        • There will be NO ASAs on Friday
    • Report Cards
      • Available to parents through ManageBac
  • December 16 – January 3 – Winter Break (No School)
  • January 6 – Classes Resume

Condor Sports

  • December 10 – SS boys basketball vs. Loupiots
  • December 12 – SS girls basketball vs. Loupiots

 

We’re on Twitter!

Follow TASOK @TASOKinshasa

Follow TASOK PYP @TASOKPYP

Follow Fourth Grade @Scholarsare

Hashtag #TASOK

 

Learner Profile Trait of the Month – COMMUNICATOR

**Check back later in the week for additional homework related to in-class discussions and activities.

 

Home Learning for December 2-6 (Week 15)

  1. Read for at least 30 minutes each night. Complete the online reading log OR one on paper. (Copies are available in class).
  2. Reflect back on Week 14, and complete the “Reflection: Learner Profile & Approaches to Learning” form.
  3. Explore the recommendations on IXL.com. These connect directly to what we have been learning in class.
  • **A Scholar has a goal: This week, we answered over 390 questions and almost 3  hours = 3.0 hours = 180 minutes  on IXL. 

Announcements

  1. Library is scheduled weekly on Thursdays.
  2. P.E. is scheduled weekly on Wednesdays and Fridays.
    1. Come dressed to exercise – sneakers, hat, sunscreen.
    2. Bring a water bottle
  3. Check your lunch card balance weekly.

Coming Soon

Below is a list of upcoming events of which to be aware.

  • December 2, 3:30 p.m. – ES soccer team vs Congo English Forever
  • December 7, 10:00 a.m. – Association General Meeting (CAC)
  • December 9, 3:30 p.m. – ES soccer team vs Congo English Forever
  • December 13
    • Assembly
    • Early Dismissal – 11:30 a.m.
  • December 16 – January 3 – Winter Break (No School)

Condor Sports

  • December 5 – MS boys soccer vs. Cartesien
  • December 10 – SS boys basketball vs. Loupiots
  • December 12 – SS girls basketball vs. Loupiots

 

We’re on Twitter!

Follow TASOK @TASOKinshasa

Follow TASOK PYP @TASOKPYP

Follow Fourth Grade @Scholarsare

Hashtag #TASOK

 

Learner Profile Trait of the Month – COMMUNICATOR

**Check back later in the week for additional homework related to in-class discussions and activities.

 

International Day = Culture, Clothing Cuisine,… Coming Together

Today began with a Flag Ceremony. First thing this morning, staff, students, and some parents, many wearing traditional clothing or clothing that represented their home country, lined the central sidewalk running from the parking lot to the high school soccer field. Students hailing from the United Kingdom gathered closest to the parking lot, where Ms. Paula, in full patriotic costume, was enthusiastically encouraging students. From there, students from the Turkey and Thailand gathered by their respective flags, which continued in reverse alphabetical order all the way to Albania. Students from our host country, The Democratic Republic of the Congo, gathered at the front of the line, waiting to lead the Flag Ceremony onto the field.

In Olympic-like fashion, each nation was announced by Dr. Mullen, followed by some cheering and marching to the beat of some marvelous music. It’s amazing to see how we can celebrate and be unified by such diversity.

After the parade, we gathered for our all-school photo. We maneuvered ourselves to create a map of the DRC with IB in the center. The idea was from the grade 10 design class; they wanted TASOK to be represented as an IB school in the Congo. Once again this year, the photo was taken by… a fleet of drones!!

The photo has not yet been released, but we will post it here when it’s ready.

 

Much of the rest of the day was spent watching the clock as the much-anticipated International Lunch approached. At 11:15 a.m., older students made the traditional trek to the elementary school to meet their assigned elementary buddies with whom they enjoyed a fabulous feast. We were buddied with grade 9 students this year, which allowed us to all eat together and enjoy one another’s company and conversation. Tables decorated with patterned pagne cloth and set with napkin-wrapped utensils welcomed the students to the covered basketball court. With patience and politeness, students and staff perused the beautiful and bountiful buffet and selected samples to savor. Congolese beignets, Lebanese tabouleh, Turkish mercimek koftesi, Malagasy mofo laisoa, and… American mac and cheese were only a few of the featured foods. For almost 90 minutes, our TASOK family lingered over this mouthwatering meal. And, when it was all over, students even stuck around to serve by cleaning up.

 

At one point, we participated in a flash mob, led by third grade. Fun! Thank you, Mrs. Fischer, for coordinating this secret surprise.

Thank you to those who helped coordinate the lunch and prepared delicious dishes for us to sample. Know we are grateful.

We are also grateful for Ms. Hall and her willingness to share her love for music with us and for the opportunity to share our love for music with the TASOK community.

 

Home Learning for November 25-29 (Week 14)

  1. Read for at least 30 minutes each night. Complete the online reading log OR one on paper. (Copies are available in class).
  2. Reflect back on Week 13, and complete the “Reflection: Learner Profile & Approaches to Learning” form.
  3. Explore the recommendations on IXL.com. These connect directly to what we have been learning in class.
  • **A Scholar has a goal: This week, we answered over 950 questions and spent over 7  hours = 7.0 hours = 420 minutes  on IXL. 

Announcements

  1. Library is scheduled weekly on Thursdays.
  2. P.E. is scheduled weekly on Wednesdays and Fridays.
    1. Come dressed to exercise – sneakers, hat, sunscreen.
    2. Bring a water bottle
  3. Check your lunch card balance weekly.

Coming Soon

Below is a list of upcoming events of which to be aware.

  • November 25 – Trimester 2 ASAs begin
  • November 27 – International Day
    • Flag Ceremony – 8:15 a.m.
    • International Lunch – 11:15 a.m.
    • Early Dismissal – 12:45 p.m.

  • November 28-29 – Thanksgiving Break (No School)
  • December 2, 3:30 p.m. – ES soccer team vs Congo English Forever
  • December 9, 3:30 p.m. – ES soccer team vs Congo English Forever
  • December 13, 11:30 a.m. – Early Dismissal
  • December 16 – January 3 – Winter Break (No School)

Condor Sports

  • December 5 – MS boys soccer vs. Cartesien
  • December 10 – SS boys basketball vs. Loupiots
  • December 12 – SS girls basketball vs. Loupiots

 

We’re on Twitter!

Follow TASOK @TASOKinshasa

Follow TASOK PYP @TASOKPYP

Follow Fourth Grade @Scholarsare

Hashtag #TASOK

 

Learner Profile Trait of the Month – THINKER


**Check back later in the week for additional homework related to in-class discussions and activities.

 

Diligence and Dancing

We had a fabulously focused morning of research, continuing our inquiry into essays. Students worked diligently to gathering information and piece it together into an instructional presentation. It was exciting to see all the pieces come together and to see how deeply we understood this new genre of writing.

 

In math, we used base ten blocks to explore decimals in concrete, pictorial, and abstract ways. Students use the manipulatives to represent a decimal, which their partner had to identify and explain. Most students were able to share their learning on Seesaw. As some prepared their Seesaw presentations, they made some minor mistakes, which were very valuable for learning. We love to celebrate mistakes because they provide us an opportunity to reflect and be open-minded.

Check out the following video from YouCubed (one of my favorite math and mindset resources).

Mistakes

How does this video connect to our central idea related to struggle and survival?

Here’s another one that celebrates the brain-growing power of mistakes.

  • What mistakes can you celebrate today?
  • How did your mistakes provide an opportunity for you to struggle?
  • How did your mistakes help your brain grow?

Challenge: Think of a metaphor or simile to illustrate the power of mistakes?

 

This afternoon, after P.E., we went to music to practice for Wednesday’s International Day performance. Ms. Paula and Ms. TaShawndra dropped in during the practice and were quite amazed at our voices.

 

Mr. Sheldrick and his kindergarten and first grade students shared their learning with us during their student-led assembly. We were able to make some connections to our compass point activities this past week.

After the assembly, we headed straight to Mrs. Fischer’s room for a top secret practice. I can’t say much more because… it’s top secret.

Here’s a link to the video, if you’re interested in practicing.

Word Work Beyond Our Words of the Week

After a brief investigation into our words of the week, we continued with some word analysis related to the Primary Year Program (PYP) and our transdisciplinary theme. Using some of the same tools, we broke down the word and gained a better understanding of how the PYP is organized.

We then began to examine our theme for our current unit – Where We Are in Time and Place. Working in our table groups, we read the description of the theme and noted words and phrases that were interesting and into which we might inquire further. Working together, students annotated the description. This will be a document we revisit throughout our unit as we become more knowledgeable about and make connections with our central idea through our lines of inquiry.

We then continued our investigative work by conducting research about… essays (see related post).

We also continued our work with decimals, looking at how to create number lines… with hundredths in an effective and efficient way.

Expanding Our Writing Repertoire with… Expository Essays

We had a incredible day of investigation. Whether we were using multiple sources to find the meaning or origin of new words or thinking about our new transdisciplinary theme or digging in to decimals, students demonstrated dedication and determination in delightful ways today.

As we move into our third unit of inquiry, we will be looking at a new genre of writing… expository essays. This type of essay is designed to explain. Beginning with a thesis or belief statement, students will seek to identify reasons for this belief and will work to support these reasons with elaboration in the form of anecdotes (mini-story), examples, and / or descriptions.

Today, we inquired into what an essay is. Students had a number of print and digital resources to explore. As students dug into the materials, parts, purpose, procedure, and perfecting were areas about which to research.

 

Made with Padlet

 

With Thanksgiving coming up, we will soon be presented with a prompt and determine what it is asking (part of the procedure). We will be writing about gratitude. After discussing this idea deeply, we will craft a thesis statement and record two reasons with supporting examples on our graphic organizers. We will use this information to draft our hook and body paragraphs. This will be a sample setting us up for a more significant essay about struggle.

The creators of Flocabulary use rap to review the elements of an essay and the purpose of each.

Flocabulary: Five Paragraph Essay

Optional Multiple Source: NoRedInk: Essay Essentials

Word Walk. Decimal Talk.

Wednesday began with word work, with our special guest Mrs. Kovacs. We continued our work with the Frayer model, especially focusing on connections and sentences related to our words. Upon completion of our posters, we conducted a focused gallery walk, providing sticky note feedback for one another. Some sticky notes highlighted learning, others posed questions, and still others offered scholarly suggestions for further consideration.

 

During math, we began to explore decimals. Using a 10 x 10 grid as a pictorial / visual tool, we were able to identify the whole as 100/100 = 100 hundredths (1.00) = 10 tenths (1.0). We then proceeded to look at parts of the whole, making connections to fractions. Connections to the place value chart and our understanding of place, value, and equivalence were helpful.


As you watch the following video, keep in mind THE WHOLE.

  • How is the whole in this video different than the whole we used in class.
  • How does that affect our representation?

 

Gallery Walk. Grid Book. Game Time!

This morning, we started by finishing our Compass Points visible thinking routine. We jotted down things what Worries (W) us about the ideas of struggle and survival. Students then conducted a gallery walk, reading and reflecting on one another’s ideas. Observations, questions, and additional thinking were added to our recording sheets for future consideration. A number of powerful ideas worth pursuing were noted and shared. This will definitely be an interesting, introspective, and impactful inquiry.

Today, as we continued to launch into our new unit, we tackled a tough text titled A Song for Cambodia by Michelle Lord. This story takes us on a treacherous journey with Arn, a boy from a village in northern Cambodia. With well-chosen words, the author allows us to step into Arn’s shoes (an idiomatic phrase meaning to see life from someone else’s perspective). This story prompted a number of important inquiry questions related to survival and struggle and Cambodia’s history, which we will investigate further in the days ahead.

Pausing periodically allowed us to ponder Arn’s experience deeply. Throughout, questions were posed – perfect for our pursuit into a tough topic. We also spent quite a bit of time talking about the foreword, which contains important historical information that made us yearn for more information. Another one of our wonderings was about the genre of the book – is it fiction or nonfiction? If fiction, is it realistic or historical? If nonfiction, is it narrative nonfiction? How can we tell? We highlighted a number of keywords we could use to find out more about this story and whether or not it is true? What other factual information related to the setting (time and place) would help use better understand this story? What kinds of multiple sources would be most helpful? Lots to think and wonder about…

In the days ahead, we will complete our summary graphic organizer, which will require us to think critically about the main character’s motivation, conflict, plot, and theme. We will also have opportunity to compare Arn’s story with others as we pursue the following lines of inquiry:

  • People adapt and change over time as a result of conflict
  • People’s personal responses to adversity
  • Action as a result of adversity

Multiple Source

Watch the following video featuring the REAL Arn Chorn Pond. In his own words, he shares about his struggle to survive in Cambodia and the different, but equally challenging, struggles he had in his new home in New Hampshire. It is amazing to hear his story and to think about our own stories and the stories of those around us.

In math, we worked to apply our learning about comparing fractions by ordering a set of fractions. Using pictorial / visual tools like fraction bars and number lines, we were able to consider fractions’ relationship to the whole and to one another. We used what we knew about common numerators, common denominators, benchmarks, and equivalent fractions to help us.

We did not learn the following strategy in class, but it is another way to efficiently compare and order fractions. Your mom and dad probably know this way. The question is… why does it work? Hmmm…

This afternoon, we had a visit from Ms. TaShawndra. She reshared with us one of our favorite books, The Invisible Boy. As with any rereading, we were able to think more deeply about the ideas and were able to connect to our central idea – People respond differently to conflict. After reading and discussing the big idea in the book, we began a game of empathy jeopardy. Teams worked together to respond to the following categories of questions:

  1. Act It Out
  2. Sketch It
  3. True or False
  4. Imagine If…
  5. Risk 

Each group, when presented with a scenario, has a short time to discuss their responses prior to sharing. All groups were excited about the game and thoughtful in their responses. Unfortunately, we were not able to finish the game, but we were able to schedule Ms. TaShawndra for a follow up session tomorrow. Can’t wait to continue conversing about empathy and ways to share caring to our community members.

 

Compass Points. Comparing. Cupcakes.

While we are still finishing up bits and pieces of our inquiry into movement as a change agent, we launched into our new unit today with a reflective quick write and a visible thinking routine: Compass Points. We began by considering our Needs (N) related to struggle and survival. We followed that up by making a Stance (S) and exploring what Excites (E) us about this central idea. Tomorrow, we will consider what Worries (W) us.

Challenge: Compass Points

As an extension of our visible thinking routine, consider the formation and purpose of a compass and compass rose. Start by labeling the four cardinal directions (north – N, south – S, east – E, and west – W). Connect your work with fractions, by dividing your compass into eighths, adding the intermediate directions (northwest – NW, northeast – NE, southwest – SW, southeast – SE). To challenge your brain, divide the eighths in half to make sixteenths. Using your detective skills, determine how to label these tertiary directions, combining the adjacent cardinal and intermediate directions (north northwest – NNW, west northwest – WNW, west southwest – WSW, south southwest – SSW,  north northeast – NNE, east northeast – ENE, east southeast – ESE, south southeast – SSE).

As a connection to our unit on Japan, check out this tutorial on making your own compass rose.

If you’d like to really exercise your brain, check out the following video that includes fractions, directions, and… degrees (angles), a math topic we will focus more on later in the year.

Challenge: Pointing Us in the Right Direction Padlet

  • What questions do you have about the compass?
  • How could you find out more?
  • How could a compass help us explore our area of focus?
  • How does a compass connect to our central idea of struggle and survival?

Made with Padlet

 

 

Made with Padlet

We moved further into our exploration of fractions today by considering how to compare fractions using like numerators, like denominators, benchmarks, and equivalent fractions. Number lines and strip diagrams / fraction bars were especially helpful as we tried to grappled with this concept.

To top off the day, we had an opportunity to celebrate Keira. While she is a special ray of sunshine each and every day, today Keira brought an extra bit of flare with her brightly-colored, sparkly-sprinkled cupcakes. Not only were they dazzling, they were delicious! Happy birthday, Keira!

 

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