Goals, Growth, Grid Book, and… Gratitude

We had another fast and furious Monday.

Our discussion about our vocabulary was filled with questions, comments, and connections about the meanings, relationships, and spelling patterns. All of these details are valuable. Please add to the padlet with your own ideas and resources.

Made with Padlet

Instead of continuing our read aloud of Tua and the Elephant today, we spent some time reflecting on ourselves as learners and on our learning habits. We then set some goals as we head into the last quarter of fourth grade. This will help us focus our learning and target our areas for growth as fifth grade approaches.

During library, we divided our time between D.E.A.R. time, which we all appreciate, and an assessment on how to use the card catalog – destiny.tasok.net After a couple weeks of practice, students had the opportunity to show off their searching skills by entering a keyword, title, or author; writing the call number; locating the book on the shelf, and verifying the find with Ms. Kraft. While we still have a bit of work to do with certain sections of the library (genrefied fiction, especially), we are definitely showing growth.

Today was our last session of swimming before the swim gala on Friday. Since the swim gala is a culmination of all our hard work throughout our swim season, we trust our moms and dad will be able to come see us splash around and celebrate our strokes.

This afternoon, after a series of specials, we returned to the room to analyze angles. We talked about turns (a.k.a. rotations), portions of a circle (quarter, half, three-quarter, full / whole), and connections to the clock. We also referenced our benchmarks of 90, 180, 270, and 360 degrees. The connections being made seemed almost endless.

The finale of our day was a birthday celebration. Kyle’s mom joined us with a colorful cake and juice. We greatly appreciated this opportunity to celebrate a special young man!

   

 

Homework for Mar. 18-22 (Week 28)

  1. Read for at least 30 minutes each night. Complete the online reading log OR one on paper. (Copies are available in class).
  2. Explore some lessons on IXL.com and / or Khan Academy in the following areas:
    • Math
      • *Angles (Z.1 – Z.5)
      • Data and Graphs (J.1 – J.8)
      • Logical Reasoning
      • Word Problems (R.15)
    • Language
      • Verb Tense (HH.1 – HH.8)
      • Greek and Latin Roots (S.1 – S.6)
      • Character Descriptions (F.1 – F.3)
    • **A Scholar has a goal: This week, we answered 3,658 questions and over 33 hours on IXL. Another great week of learning!
    • Log on and “Launch” into some learning with Everyday Math. (Note: Log on information is in your planner.) **Alert: Any lessons in Unit 4 and 5 can be reviewed.**
  3. Reflect back on Week 27 and complete the “Reflection: Learning Habits” form.
  4. Note: Homework is due on Fridays.**Check back later in the week for additional homework related to in-class discussions and activities.

    Announcements

    1. Library is scheduled weekly on Mondays from 9:30 – 10:10 a.m.
      • Be sure to bring your book bag!
    2. P.E. is scheduled weekly on Mondays and Fridays.
      1. Alert: We will be SWIMMING this week.

 

Coming Soon

  • Mar. 20 – Eric Carle Exhibition – 5:30 – 7:00 p.m.
  • Mar. 22 – Swim Gala

  • Mar. 25-Apr. 5 – Spring Break

 

Learner Profile Trait of the Month – RISK-TAKER

Data, Degrees, Descriptions, and… the Digits of Pi

After starting our day with an intense encounter between Tua and the mahouts, we dove into data like she dove into a pile of cabbages.

After reflecting on our work from yesterday, today’s data allowed us to think more about the importance of a clear number line. As a result of scholarly curiosity, we also mulled over mean, median, and mode. While this was not a planned part of our lesson, we investigated these ideas because we were interested.

More Math Antics

We also revisited the idea of angles today. After watching a PBS video called, “What’s a 360?” we looked at a circle that had been divided into 360/360. Each slice represented a rotation of 1 degree.

Circle with 360 Degrees

We then thought about what we have been learning about fractions, equivalent fractions, and… the clock. The clock was today’s very valuable multiple source.  We started by thinking about the different ways a WHOLE clock is divided. We discovered that a WHOLE clock can be divided into:

  • 2/2 (There are 2 sections, 1 for each half hour)
  • 4/4 (There are 4 sections, 1 for each quarter hour.)
  • 12/12 (There are 12 sections, 1 for each hour.)
  • 60/60 (There are 60 sections, 1 for each minute.)

We then examined the angle of the clock’s hands when it is 3:00 p.m. When the minute hand is on the 12 and the hour hand is on the 3, the rays make a right angle or a 90 degree angle. We then connected this to our understanding for fractions – if we slice the clock into 4 pieces, the portion represented when it is 3:00 p.m. is 1/4 (one fourth).

  • 1/4 = 3/12 = 15/60 = 90/360
  • These are all equivalent.
  • 90/360 represents the number of degrees (90 °) when it is 3:00 p.m.

We then looked at how many degrees each set of 5 minutes represents.

  • 1/12 = 5/60 = 30/360
  • These are all equivalent fractions.
  • 30/360 represents the number of degrees (30°) when the hands are separated by 5 minutes (eg. 1:00 p.m.)

Finally, we looked at how many degrees each minute represented.

  • 1/60 = 6/360
  • These are equivalent fractions.
  • 6/360 represents the number of degrees (6 °) when the hands are separated by 1 minute.

Image result for degrees and clock

Based on what you know about fractions, equivalent fractions, and angles… what is the size of the angle represented on the clock above. How do you know?

As I started looking for video resources, I just couldn’t stop. There were so, SO many options for using this model to solve problems about fractions, angles, and time. Here are just few samples. As a scholar, definitely consider these multiple sources. Which one exercises your brain the most?

JoAnn’s School

 

The final chunk of our day was spent working on our symbols and symbol descriptions. Our deadline for completion is tomorrow. It might be a struggle, but… we will survive.

 

Pi Day!!!!

While we didn’t talk about this today, because we were working with circles today and because the date is March 13 (3-14), it is important to include some information acknowledge… Pi Day.

Pi is the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter. To learn more, check out the following resources. Pi is really math-magical!

 

Visualizing Pi

From Visually.

Many… MANY multiple sources:

Color, Coding, and Constructing

It was a wonderful Wednesday!

After reading more about Tua and her elephant (things are getting complicated), we prepared for our buddies.

We began our time with our buddies sharing a read aloud called Red is a Dragon.


This book not only had a connection to our region of study, but allowed us to share something we all knew and love… COLOR. Yesterday, we started to write “I am…” poems related to being a risk-taker, so we used that same format to help our buddies write poems about a color. This was a tad challenging, but with patient and persistent prompting, we were able to craft some creative, color-filled poems. It was nice, at the end, to just share some quiet reading time with Eric Carle books.

      

After recess, we had another appointment… this time with sixth graders. For the last several weeks, sixth grade students have been preparing a lesson to teach us how to use Ozobots. A small groups of student leaders communicated regularly with Mrs. Rupp, gathering information about our class, sharing ideas, and receiving feedback. All their planning culminated in today’s big event. Upon our arrival, we were greeted by the sixth grade students and invited to sit in pre-established triads. The group leaders then shared a brief presentation establishing expectations, setting the purpose, and sharing the agenda for our time together. With clear signals and expectations, sixth grade students divided and conquered. The challenge… use the iPads to design a dance for the Ozobots, which would culminate in a dance off. Fourth grade scholars, along with their sixth grade coaches were completely engaged in the process the entire time, experimenting with various designs, patterns, colors and codes. Students were willing to take risks and receive feedback. It was especially interesting to see how everyone from both classes showed a number of learner profile traits – open-minded, communicator, knowledgeable, risk-taker, principled, and reflective. After the dance off, students then had to create a color-coded pattern for speed in preparation for a final race.  Exciting!!

            

To end our day, we worked to represent our data on a line plot. The trickiest part was creating the number line. As it happened, after we started, we had to revise and redo our line, so all our data fit without being too tight.

Sizing Things Up

Tuesday was typically teeming with tons of tasks.

We started by reading about Tua and her elephant. What do you do with an fugitive elephant? Well, bring her into the kitchen, of course. As we track Tua’s troubles in our plot diagram, we are also talking about tricky words and terrific ways the author shows not tells. As was true in our last read aloud, figurative language continues to be a critical component of a writer’s craft.

After having explored multiple ways to represent fractional number stories, we captured a variety of strategies for solving problems involving mixed numbers in our multiple source grid books.


Then, we set our to apply what we know about halves and wholes to measuring each other’s heads to the nearest half centimeter. Everyone had the opportunity to try out the measuring tape and to read and record the fraction noted on this number line tool. Our results will be used to create a line plot tomorrow.

 

Our biggest head size was 63 centimeters. Our smallest head size was 45 centimeters. Tomorrow, we will figure out what the most common (mode) head size is in fourth grade. Care to venture a guess?

Part of our day was also dedicated to drafting a poem related to our learner profile trait of the month – risk taker. Thinking about some of our recent vocabulary words and reflecting on our knowledge about risk takers, we brainstormed a list of related words. Then, we chose one word with which to start an “I am…” poem. While some are still drafting, many manage to manipulate words in a way that resulted in rich descriptions of who risk takers are. After revising, these poem will be posted publicly for others to ponder.

Here’s a preview of a few poems in their draft forms. Reflection and revision are still needed prior to publishing, but these are off to a great start.

I am… by Leslee Rupp

We ended our day by working on our symbols of struggle and survival. We reviewed the expectations on our single-point rubric and got right to work. As some finished up their artifacts, they began work on the description, which is to detail the parts, process, and purpose of their symbol. The end products will be powerful.

 

Mots merveilleux, même en maths

Once again at the outset of this week, we relished some rigorous words to add to our repertoire.

 

Made with Padlet

 

As we continue to think about words and word parts, the following word-related resources might be helpful. Being a word detective can be challenging, but it just might pique your curiosity and inspire you to learn more.

Multiple Sources

We also examined words in math number stories. As we seek to Understand, Plan, Solve, and Check (UPS Check) math problems, reading and rereading is important to ensure we have identified all the important information and know how it will help solve the problem. Envisioning or visualizing the problem by thinking through the steps that could be taken to actually act out the problem in a real-life situation is critical. In addition, we realized that how the problem is worded might affect the strategy or model we use to solve. Number lines, fraction bars, number models (equations), and words all are just a few choices for representing and justifying our thinking as math-magicians.

The following video shows how understanding of fractions develops over time and highlights the many ways to represent fractions and why they are important. This video is designed for teachers, but I challenge you, as scholars, to consider a different point of view as you watch and think.


Check out this 3-Act Task featured on Mr. Fletcher’s website. How would you solve it?

Do the Dew

Submit your thinking about the Three-Act Tasks using the linked documents.

Alert: Be sure you are signed in to your Google Classroom if you choose to accept the Three-Act Task challenge, and “Share” the documents with Mrs. Rupp when you are complete.

Homework for Mar. 11-15 (Week 27)

  1. Read for at least 30 minutes each night. Complete the online reading log OR one on paper. (Copies are available in class).
  2. Explore some lessons on IXL.com and / or Khan Academy in the following areas:
    • Math
      • *Add and Subtract Fractions with like denominators (Q.1 – Q.14)
      • Add and Subtract Fractions with unlike denominators (R.1 – R.7)
      • Logical Reasoning
      • Word Problems (R.15)
    • Language
      • Homophones (W.1 – W.3)
      • Supporting Details (N.3 – N.4)
      • Effects of Figurative Language on Meaning and Tone (E.6)
    • **A Scholar has a goal: This week, we answered 4,218 questions and almost 32 hours on IXL. WOW!!
  3. Log on and “Launch” into some learning with Everyday Math. (Note: Log on information is in your planner.) **Alert: Any lessons in Unit 4 and 5 can be reviewed.**
  4. Reflect back on Week 26 and complete the “Reflection: Learning Habits” form.
  5. Note: Homework is due on Fridays.**Check back later in the week for additional homework related to in-class discussions and activities.

    Announcements

    1. Library is scheduled weekly on Mondays from 9:30 – 10:10 a.m.
      • Be sure to bring your book bag!
    2. P.E. is scheduled weekly on Mondays and Fridays.
      1. Alert: We will be SWIMMING this week.

 

Coming Soon

  • Mar. 13 – Mix-it-Up Picnic
  • Mar. 15 – Elementary Talent Show
  • Mar. 17 – Cafe Music Smile Service Learning Event – CAC
  • Mar. 20 – Eric Carle Exhibition – 5:30 – 7:00 p.m.
  • Mar. 22 – Swim Gala
  • Mar. 25-Apr. 5 – Spring Break

 

Learner Profile Trait of the Month – RISK-TAKER

Music, Meet Math! Math, Meet Music!

After resting to the rhythm of last night’s rain, we were welcomed to a new week with a calm, cool morning.

As is our tradition, we began with our vocabulary words for the week, which were a tad trickier than usual. Most of these words are a preview for our next unit of inquiry.

Made with Padlet

We then jumped right into math, which involved looking at multiple ways to represent the addition of fractions. Our main tool for today was the number line, which proved quite useful.

During library, Ms. Kraft sent us on a scavenger hunt, using Destiny’s catalogue to find call numbers for various topics and titles. Scholar had a great time running around trying to locate books in the fiction, nonfiction, and genre-fied sections.

After recess, we returned to class. Mr. Jimmy was away today, so we ended up having music in the class. Of course, we couldn’t have music without… math. While Mr. Jimmy’s absence could have been a problem, we turned it into an opportunity to connect notes to… fractions. Working with partners, we created a four-meter rhythm with a related fraction equation.

Image result for fractions and music

Image result for fractions and music

Multiple Sources for Music and Math

 

Homework for Mar. 4 – 8 (Week 26)

  1. Read for at least 30 minutes each night. Complete the online reading log OR one on paper. (Copies are available in class).
  2. Explore some lessons on IXL.com and / or Khan Academy in the following areas:
    • Math
      • *Adding and Subtracting Fractions (Q.1 – Q.14)
      • Logical Reasoning
    • Language
      • Adjectives (JJ.1 – JJ.13)
      • Linking Words (M.1 – M.4)
      • Similes & Metaphors (E.2 – E.4)
    • **A Scholar has a goal: This week, we answered 2,586 questions and almost 22 hours on IXL. 
  3. Log on and “Launch” into some learning with Everyday Math. (Note: Log on information is in your planner.) **Alert: Any lessons in Unit 4 can be reviewed.**
  4. Reflect back on Week 25 and complete the “Reflection: Learning Habits” form.
  5. Note: Homework is due on Fridays.**Check back later in the week for additional homework related to in-class discussions and activities.

    Announcements

    1. Library is scheduled weekly on Mondays from 9:30 – 10:10 a.m.
      • Be sure to bring your book bag!
    2. P.E. is scheduled weekly on Mondays and Fridays. Come dressed to exercise – sneakers, hat, sunscreen.
    3. ASAs Resume this week.

Coming Soon

  • Mar. 4 – Trimester 3 ASAs begin
  • Mar. 8 – Parent Workshop (*Recommended in anticipation of next year’s Grade 5 Exhibition) – 8:15 – 9:30 a.m.
  • Mar. 13 – Mix-it-Up Picnic
  • Mar. 15 – Elementary Talent Show
  • Mar. 20 – Eric Carle Exhibition – 5:30 – 7:00 p.m.
  • Mar. 22 – Swim Gala
  • Mar. 25-Apr. 5 – Spring Break

 

Learner Profile Trait of the Month – RISK-TAKER

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